Lidar

It was lightly snowing last night, ice crystals falling from high, thin clouds as I walked from the Big House to the Green House. Looking towards the MSF there was just enough ice in the air to illuminate the ICECAPS LiDAR – a laser measuring cloud matter, phase, and crystal orientation. ICECAPS is a relatively large, long-term project researching cloud characteristics and their impact on climate. This knowledge is crucial in developing climate models as well as understanding our changing climate. More information can be found here: www.esrl.noaa.gov/arctic/observatories/summit.

Most of the time the laser is invisible, however with just the right conditions enough light can be reflected back to show the brilliant green beam. If you look carefully you can also see the vertical laser, however this is weaker and thus less visible. Beautiful science!

*If you are familiar with LiDARs you may have seen this spelled LIDAR, lidar, LiDAR, or LADAR – according to NOAA’s Digital Coast Blog all spellings are correct though LiDAR is gaining in popularity. 

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The ICECAPS LiDAR here at Summit

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The LiDAR at NOAA’s ARO facility at the South Pole Station

 

An example of the LiDAR data:

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2 Comments

Filed under Arctic, Greenland, Science, Science!, Summit Station

2 responses to “Lidar

  1. Jon salisbury

    Wow I want to thank you making my day. That photo of the laser in the sky was fantastic. I have passed on antarticartic to many of my friends and we all enjoy discussing your blogs and living vicariously through your writing.

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